Stefano Tommesani

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Necessary evil: testing private methods

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Some might say that testing private methods should be avoided because it means not testing the contract, that is the interface implemented by the class, but the internal implementation of the class itself. Still, not all classes were designed with testability in mind, so real life compromises sometimes demand such a trick.

When writing unit tests in C# with MSTest, the PrivateObject class lets you easily call private methods:

  1. [TestMethod]
  2. public void TestLPRead()
  3. {
  4.   var Logger = A.Fake<ILogger>();
  5.   var Telemetry = A.Fake<ITelemetry>();
  6.   DefaultDataModel DM = new DefaultDataModel(Logger, Telemetry);
  7.   PrivateObject obj = new PrivateObject(DM);
  8.   List<LPRead> ReadsList = (List<LPRead>)obj.Invoke("GetReads");

In the code above, a PrivateObject instance is created passing an instance of the class to be tested

  1. PrivateObject obj = new PrivateObject(DM);

then the invocation of the private method, that would be

  1. List<LPRead> ReadsList = DM.GetReads();

if the method were public, becomes

  1. List<LPRead> ReadsList = (List<LPRead>)obj.Invoke("GetReads");
Last Updated on Sunday, 29 January 2017 22:39
 

I am right and you are wrong

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Objectivity3Have you ever convinced anyone that disagreed with you about a deeply held belief?

Better yet, have you changed your mind lately on an important topic after discussing with someone else that did not share your point of view?

Let's face it, if the topic of the discussion is not trivial, it is far easier to just keep repeating our (obviously bullet-proof) reasons and wonder why others don't just recognize our view as being the "correct" one. And we have proof that, the wider the gap between our own views and those of someone who disagrees with us, the stronger the impact of Naïve realism, and so we find no phenomenological trace of self-interested bias in the way we have considered the pertinent arguments.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 28 December 2016 15:47
 

How Commercial Insight changes R&D

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The CEB's Commercial Insight is based on three pillars:

  1. Be credible/relevant – Demonstrate an understanding of the customer’s world, substantiating claims with real-world evidence.
  2. Be frame-breaking – Disrupt the customer’s current logic, revealing an underappreciated aspect of the customer’s environment or a flawed assumption.
  3. Lead back to your unique strengths – Refer customers specifically to areas where you outperform competitors

Points #2 and #3 are critical to avoid the commoditization of solutions, the worst scenario for suppliers, as the buyers are satisfied with a limited set of functionalities shared among several products of competing companies and trigger a price-based war. The CEB research shows that most times suppliers are asked for a proposal when the internal process is around 57%, usually very close to an official RFP, where the the project already has shaped up and it is increasingly difficult to steer it to the strong, distinguishing features of the product.

57-percent-stat

If you think this is bad, think of all the projects that are not even reaching 57% as the average 5.4 subjects involved in the purchasing decision are not agreeing and moving the project forward:

Demand-Gen-2_Forbes

Last Updated on Sunday, 25 December 2016 23:32
 

Windows Forms smells funny, but...

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In the "2016 .NET Community Report" just released by Telerik, the answers to the question "What technology would you choose if building for Windows Desktop?" were as follows:

WinFormsWPFUsage

So roughly half of new desktop developments would be based on Windows Forms, a technology declared dead multiple times. The Telerik report states: 

This is somewhat surprising when you consider Windows Forms is under maintenance mode,with no new features being added. For larger organizations, which may havelonger iteration cycles or legacy OS requirements, Windows Forms remains aviable platform for building desktop applications.

Last Updated on Thursday, 07 April 2016 16:05
 

Say goodbye to "it does not happen on my PC!" with Azure

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AzureLogoIt is not easy to monitor how our code behaves on a vast array of different machines. A myriad of different configurations can lead to errors that are difficult to reproduce and even more difficult to anticipate. And when the customer calls complaining about a crash, provided information on what lead to the problem is often incomplete or misleading. Fortunately, remote telemetry of software applications is here to help and is going mainstream even in the desktop area. Let's see how easy it is to monitor a desktop Windows application using the new Azure Application Insights service: this article on the Azure site explains all the necessary steps. Summing up, here is what we need to do:

  1. create an Application Insights resource in the Azure portal
  2. make a copy of the Instrumentation key, as we will need it later in our app
  3. add one of the following NuGet packages: Microsoft.ApplicationInsights.WindowsServer for the full set of functionalities, including performance counter collection and dependency monitoring, or Microsoft.ApplicationInsights that includes the core API only
  4. initialize the TelemetryClient object in your app
  5. set the intrumentation key in the code of the app: TelemetryConfiguration.Active.InstrumentationKey = " your key ";
  6. insert telemetry calls, like TrackPageView, TrackException etc.

For additional reference on these steps, check out the official ApplicationInsights repository on GitHub.

Last Updated on Saturday, 12 March 2016 15:01
 

Parallel loops in the AltaLux kernel

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coloredthreads

The AltaLux plugin for IrfanView is now open-source (here is the GitHub link) and it is worth analyzing the different methods used for parallelizing the computational kernel. The filter factory, contained in the CAltaLuxFilterFactory files, can create one of four possible instance types (actually there's a fifth one that you will never want to use, as we will see later). Most of the plumbing code is hosted in a base abstract class, named CBaseAltaLuxFilter, and there are four specific classes that implement the virtual Run method in different ways:

  1. CSerialAltaLuxFilter
  2. CParallelSplitLoopAltaLuxFilter
  3. CParallelEventAltaLuxFilter
  4. CParallelActiveWaitAltaLuxFilter

Let's start with the first one, the serial implementation, to have an idea of how the code works. Here is the whole Run method:

Last Updated on Monday, 01 February 2016 21:12
 
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Latest Articles

Necessary evil: testing private methods 29 January 2017, 21.41 Testing
Necessary evil: testing private methods
Some might say that testing private methods should be avoided because it means not testing the contract, that is the interface implemented by the class, but the internal implementation of the class itself. Still, not all
I am right and you are wrong 28 December 2016, 14.23 Web
I am right and you are wrong
Have you ever convinced anyone that disagreed with you about a deeply held belief? Better yet, have you changed your mind lately on an important topic after discussing with someone else that did not share your point of
How Commercial Insight changes R&D 06 November 2016, 01.21 Web
How Commercial Insight changes R&D
The CEB's Commercial Insight is based on three pillars: Be credible/relevant – Demonstrate an understanding of the customer’s world, substantiating claims with real-world evidence. Be frame-breaking – Disrupt the
Windows Forms smells funny, but... 07 April 2016, 15.38 Software
Windows Forms smells funny, but...
In the "2016 .NET Community Report" just released by Telerik, the answers to the question "What technology would you choose if building for Windows Desktop?" were as follows: So roughly half of new desktop developments would
Say goodbye to
It is not easy to monitor how our code behaves on a vast array of different machines. A myriad of different configurations can lead to errors that are difficult to reproduce and even more difficult to anticipate. And when the

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